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20121112
20121112
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. chris: but john boehner is holding firm against one of the president's main campaign pledges. >> everyone wants to get our economy moving again, everyone wants to get more americans back to work again. raising tax rates will slow down our ability to create the jobs that everyone says they want. chris: in your book, the price of politics, a heck of a book. you talk about how debt negotiations fell apart the last time, we tried it in the summer of 2011. will the speaker, we just saw, have the strength to lead his party even if he has to fight for the tea party? >> their camouflage is tax reform and they're going to do that over time. so the rates could come down. the really interesting thing is when you examine the detail of this, last year they were close. they actually could have worked out some agreement and it blew up because of the president asking for more revenue and that was the limit for them. i think it is a moment of necessity to a certain extent. they can't avoid this now. chris: reporting challeng
. >> paul: house speaker john boehner extends an olive branch, how much will they give >> the american welcome have spoken and they've reelected president obama and reelected a majority in the house of representatives. a mandate for us to find a way to work together on the solutions to the challenges that we all face as a nation. >> that's house speaker john boehner vowing to work with president obama on the challenges facing the nation the first the fiscal cliff, a toxic combination of tax increases and automatic spending cuts especially in defense that could take effect january 1st. so, we pointed out in the last segment, republicans held the house with minimal losses despite a big democratic year. can boehner think, look, got as much mandate as the president? >> i think he should absolutely think that, paul. the president made clear, didn't really run on the second term agenda and didn't talk about it much. i'll tell you what the mandate is right now, the mandate is that fiscal cliff, the bipartisan mandate. >> paul: to go off it is the mandate or not to go off. >> i think the stock
leadership, go to senate, deal over there and then come to boehner and box him in with a deal and present to it him. >> he also said that boehner may want that, too. boehner still doesn't control his caucus. we don't have to ask what the american people wanted. president obama ran on an explicit program of raising taxes on top earners. and boehner is still talking about the romney plan, mess around with loopholes and take away loopholes from top earners. that was romney's plan and romney lost. the president holds the cards here. the world won't come to an end on january 1st if all the rates expire. it's more of a curve. i think we can afford to go off it. >> we'll see. as we quickly approach it. my thanks to the power panel today. i really appreciate your time today. >>> coming up next, a bipartisan plan to fix the nation's debt. the co-chairs are going to join me, ed rendell and former new hampshire senator judd gregg will join me to talk about this. we want to know what you think. should general petraeus have resigned? tweet me your thoughts about this or find me on facebook. oun] today
boehner, basically had a deal in place, it ended up getting blown up at the last minute. i think there is a, perhaps, a new conciliation on both sides. i think they were waiting for the election to get over. i think the attitudes are positive on both sides. and i think they've got the framework for a deal already set up from last year. so i don't think that there are any closer but i also don't think they were that far away last year in 2011. >> do you think that closing the loopholes would be enough for a deficit reduction package? >> it doesn't appear that that's going to raise enough revenue to get to where the democrats want that to be. republicans say they don't want to raise rates. there are some -- there's some budget chicanery that can go on in terms of dealing with one baseline instead of another baseline. that's what it looked like boehner wanted to do last year. there are a lot of different options here. it's interesting, bill kristol from the weekly standard appeared to be talking to grover norquist, the anti-tax activist in those comments that he played earlier, talk
election? >> no, not at all. in fact, after election day the president, speaker boehner, senate ma minority leader mitch mcconnell all talking about the facecle life, what they were going to do, not going to do, what they wanted to negotiate, not negotiate, but on friday, as news exploded out from the cia thanks to our own andrea mitchell that the president accepted the resignation of the cia director, general david petraeus, all of that -- you have to add that plus all the things you talked about, fiscal cliff, to what the president has to deal with. as you said, no honeymoon, indeed. >> and added to what jonathan just said, julian, there are some concerns over this that this is just the tip of the iceberg. i want to play you something senator feinstein said to andrea mitchell this afternoon. >> this thing came so fast and hard. since then it's been like peeling an onion. every day another peel comes off and you see a whole new dimension to this. so my concern has actually escalated over the last few days. >> it's clear she's suggesting this is going well beyond the realm of a personal mat
if not paralyzed to get things done? the speaker boehner, mr. president, let's get some stuff going here, but how much of the responsibility lies with him? with speaker boehner, do you think? >> people want cooperation on both sides. the issue at hand will be the fiscal cliff and our budgetary situation. the president's put a proposal forward. it's incumbent on the speaker to say, what they would be willing to do and not simply say, it's not our responsibility. i think people expect everyone to live up to their responsibilities. and one thing that is clear as i moved around the country with the president is that they're hungry for that kind of cooperation. i hope that coming out of this election people will come with a renewed sense of cooperation. because it will take that to solve problems. let me just say one other thing, though, you mentioned that not much has changed. actually what is interesting is you have these super pacs spending literally billions of dollars to defeat the president and to defeat democrats running for congress. well, the president was re-elected. you have more democrats
boehner immediately saying he generally supportive of trying to close the loop holes. do you see that as raising taxes? >> what boehner said and in the republican position since republican we should reduce rates have economic growth many of which are put in by obama for the solyndra green-type energy programs. let's bring the rates down. boehner was clear he wanted increase revenues it is not a tax increase to put more americans at work. if our recovery was growing the rate reagans did more americans would be at work. in terms of raising revenue which boehner grew about. if you grew the economy at reagan levels instead of two percent and obama and french levels, just growing faster and do that for a decade, the federal government gets trillions in taxes. we could undo the damage by having higher growth. >> gretchen: that's the difference in ideology. raise it to 3#.9 percent x. replace the alternative minimum tax with the buffet and raise the state tax and long-term capitol gains from 15-20. where do you think that those four points will go in negotiations with the republicans? >
negotiate with speaker boehner, mitch mcconnell, or does he come in, give a set of demands and go hold a press conference? they can, i believe, hammer out -- >> same can the said on the other side, by the way. >> but if the president is willing to do it, the republicans have no choice. i mean, you can't turn down a president who just won re-election if he's sincere and willing to negotiate. >> going to take some bold initiatives which is my segue into your book, okay, because you've written this book about george washington and his bold moves to break the stalemate of the revolutionary war. so much has been written about george washington. what do you want readers to take away from this book that's new? >> well, i think particularly this morning is the launch of an american legacy book tour that calista and i are doing because she has two new children's books out for american history. the first thing is to say to people we have a long history of overcoming adversity. george washington is probably the greatest example of that, and in "victory at yorktown" you see him faced with a strate
it off track when there were in fact very close. i think boehner has been very clear. i think revenues are on the table. they are at the moment drawing a line on tax rates, but we will see where that goes. the last time, you are right, didn't work and we were not facing quite the same set of circumstances we are facing today so i'm cautiously optimistic although i will offer to say lastly that people sometimes say okay, it looks like simpson-bowles, everything in between zero and $4 trillion we could end up with all kinds of outcomes that may be less than i would like and maybe less than all of you would like but at least something. i'm hoping it is more over here but i don't know. >> and steve, so we are gathered here to talk about u.s. global competitiveness. how important is resolving these issues to the american position on the global economy? >> first of all i think it's important not just our position in the global comment about our position in the world. admiral mullen who was the previous chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said our greatest national security threat was our f
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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